Tag: Writing

The Name of the Blog

The reason why this blog is Desmond Write and not Desmond Writes is because the inscription is not a mere report of what I do, but a command. Desmond, Write. Sure thing, mental affliction. I’ll get right on it, spirit of ill-rest.

“Where Desmond White goes to Write” was too cute to pass up.

Rejections — GRIST, Fantastic Stories

Two rejections in one day. I really don’t feel like posturing any false sense of confidence – well, look at how many times they rejected Harry Potter, and didn’t they say Vonnegut’s account of the bombing of Dresden wasn’t “compelling enough?”

None of that. I’ve no illusions.

And I know the Ancient Greeks didn’t believe in hard work and no gain; they valued excellence. That’s why there wasn’t second place in the Olympics.

But I’m okay. I think I’ll start collecting these emails. If anything, they’ll make interesting wallpaper.

Published — “Snippets”

 

Rat Ass Review’s “Love and Madness” section published my poem “Snippets.” The online publication is devoted to poetry about “our varied attractions to one another” and isn’t “intended for children, nor for those adults whose views of individual liberty and freedom of expression would best suit them for life in 1630 Massachusetts or modern-day Syria.” Get reading because it’s an amazing, ever-growing page of stories of love and madness, if there’s even a difference. You can also find my poem (after clicking the link) by hitting CTRL-F and searching for “Desmond White.”

Writer’s Family Reunion 2016

Writespace had their Writers Family Reunion, which I attended with my future sexy wife. Writespace is located in an art studio warehouse called Silver Street, a peaceful, meditative spot. The itinerary included events like a Critique Group Speed Dating, small-group Q&A’s with local but very accomplished writers (I was lucky enough to sit with D. L. Young of Soledad fame), panels on publishing and marketing by the published and marketable, and games like pin the mustache on Faulkner.

 I learned a lot, but instead of dumping my notes on the internet, I’ll jot four things:

 (1) We have a literary scene! Houston’s not just a sunset-and-traffic, cowboy-hat-toting big oil city that’s rising into the sky as it sinks into the marsh. And that literary scene is immense, intricate, ever-expanding.

 (2) Many writers in Houston choose to self-publish but it’s a lot of work. It kind of takes an obsessive, hard-working type, or, well, a writer.

 (3) There’s a debate in the community about novel-writing. Some say that if you want to write novels, you should write novels. Others to write short fiction first and hone your skills.

 Finally, (4) Houston is very new and emerging writer friendly. 

 10/10, would write again.

Published — “Pink Pastures”

365 Tomorrow has published my speculative flash fiction “Pink Pastures.” The story was based on a dream, and since I can’t afford a therapist on a teacher’s salary, I resorted to a poor substitute (something I also know about, being a teacher). Ursula Le Guin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas” influenced the setting, plus I really wanted to write about eldritch genitalia without using the word “vagina.” You’ll notice the comments aren’t forgiving; in my defense, my “purple prose” could have been intentional on a meta-level. (It’s not). 365 Tomorrows is an online journal that produces a new speculative fiction every single flipping day. The site would be a great complement to your morning bagel and cup of raktajino.

Nonfiction — “Post-Grad Blues & Hues”

Well, hey there. I’ve been Internet-less for a portion of Summer, and yet somehow I’ve been enjoying myself. Apparently there are “real lifey” activities as fun as binge-reading Cracked.com or absorbing via the eye-holes the entire echelon of Archer. Like fishing. Well, not fishing. But other things. And I’ve been doing them. Road trips, paintball, camping, grilling, horror movie-athons. Now that I’m a graduated man I can do whatever my bank account permits i.e. purchasing a compact bow for the much needed manlification of my lifedom. Additionally, a certain relaxing (and nerdly) hobby has reappeared: the painting, configuration, and playing of Warhammer 40K.

Summer nearly over, I’ve decided to finally begin a project I’ve mostly declined through my creative writing “career,” which is the creation and completion of a first novel. There’s an idea that’s been scratching the back of my brain meat for some time: a science fiction adventure-comedy that wouldn’t require Hemingway-level chops. It’s simple, sorta funny, sorta entertaining, and wouldn’t tear me apart if it flopped. So here goes.

EDIT (August 30, 2013): The novel flopped.